Written by Hillary Truty on 04:56 reading time

When you are new to Scrum, it’s easy to focus on the concept of finishing everything you have committed to within an iteration. Because when the process instructs that you write user stories of manageable size and deliver small increments of functionality, it’s unsatisfying when the work is not done by the Sprint Review or the next Planning session, right? That is how we define carryover – work that was not done in the sprint but is still valuable, so the story needs to be carried into the next sprint for completion.

Let’s be honest. It’s not just people who are new to Scrum who feel this way. It’s veterans, too. Carryover tends to create uncertainty because it doesn’t seem to fit cleanly into the Scrum framework. But what we are learning is that carryover is as much a part of Scrum as the Daily Stand (if it weren’t, would it have ever received a name?). There are a number of reasons that carryover can happen, these are just a few we witness at Leapfrog:

  1. We under-estimated the story...
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